The second framework [23] laid out a basis for the peace treaty six months later, in particular the decision on the future of the Sinai Peninsula. Israel has agreed to withdraw its forces from Sinai, evacuate its 4,500 civilian residents and restore them to Egypt, in exchange for normal diplomatic relations with Egypt, guarantees of freedom of passage through the Suez Canal and other nearby waterways (such as the Strait of Tiran) and a limitation of the forces Egypt could establish in the Sinai Peninsula. especially 20-40 km from Israel. This process would take three years. Israel has also agreed to limit its armed forces to a smaller distance (3 km) from the Egyptian border and to guarantee free passage between Egypt and Jordan. By withdrawing, Israel also returned Abu Rudeis oil fields in west Sinai, which contained long-term commercial drilling. As part of the agreement, the United States began economic and military aid to Egypt and political support to its subsequent governments. From the Camp David peace accords of 1978 to 2000, the United States subsidized the Egyptian armed forces with more than $38 billion in aid. Egypt receives about $1.3 billion a year. [15] On July 31, 2014, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi addressed Israeli concerns and promised to pursue peace with Israel. [26] The move arose from the zeal to seek help from NATO countries to improve Egypt`s struggling economy, the belief that Egypt should begin to focus more on its own interests than on the interests of the Arab world, and the hope that an agreement with Israel would catalyze similar agreements between Israel and its other Arab neighbors and help resolve the Palestinian problem.

Prime Minister Bégin`s reaction to Sadaat`s initiative, although what Sadat or Carter did not expect, showed the willingness to engage the Egyptian leader. Like Sadat, Bégin saw many reasons why bilateral talks would be in his country`s best interest. It would allow Israel to negotiate only with Egypt, rather than with a larger Arab delegation, which could try to use its size to make undesirable or unacceptable demands. . . .